Feng Shui 102

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So last week I introduced you to the art of Feng Shui; a system of arranging, as well as removing, objects in our environment so we can live in harmony attracting positive energy, or ch’i. I hope you tried some of the simple ways to enhance your health, prosperity, and happiness. If you didn’t have time last week, no worries. Feng Shui is 3,000 years old. I think another week or so won’t be a problem.

Now let’s focus on the ways to bring this positive and vital energy into your Bedroom, Living Room, and Home Office.

Shall we adjourn to the bedroom?

BEDROOM

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So, in our go-go-go society, we typically don’t put a lot of importance on rest, unless of course we have none in our life. Then it becomes an issue. We know its value for our health, yet we still get enticed by the 3 o’clock caffeine fix, our nightly rendezvous with David Letterman, as well as our fascination with our Facebook friends and our Twitter team leader. And these are just the external factors.

Internally, I know, it’s difficult to turn off a racing mind that insists on replaying the day’s events. Even a mind that must mentally practice for tomorrow’s events will keep us up, as well as the mind that wants to take a casual stroll down Memory Lane to an event that occurred ten years ago.

But let’s give this Feng Shui thing a shot, shall we?

For all Bedrooms:

  • Try to use the bedroom for which it is intended.
  • If possible, do not have a work desk or exercise equipment in your bedroom. Both of these activities are too stimulating. If there are no other rooms for these pieces, place them as far away from your bed, and screen or cover them when not in use.
  • Locate your bed so you have a view of the door while lying in bed without being directly in front of the door. If for architectural reasons you have to be directly in front of the door, then place a bench or trunk or a footboard at the end of your bed.
  • Best colors for a bedroom are the skin tones of all races of people; beiges and browns, pinks, yellows and lavenders. It also can be very soothing to paint your walls in deeper shades of chocolate, butter cream, and raspberry.
  • Colors such as white, gray, blue, and cool greens are fine; however these rooms may feel a bit chilly and not as cozy.
  • Art work, from prints to paintings to posters, has a place in the bedroom. Just make sure you avoid violent, depressing, disturbing or busy images that could keep you from sleeping soundly.
  • Furniture should be comfortable and safe. You don’t want any sharp corners next to you while sleeping. Also, make sure your furniture has no bad memories attached to it. Did you get the dresser in a divorce settlement? Not great energy, I would think.
  • Make sure there is no clutter under the bed. I know it’s really hard not to store things there since IKEA and The Container Store make such cute storage bins. If you must, make it neat and tidy. Also, don’t store photographs of loved ones under the bed. This will place unnecessary burdens and pressure on those you love.
  • Don’t keep too many books in your bedroom. It can be too stimulating.
  • Keep your bedroom free of clutter and minimize furniture so that ch’i can flow easily throughout the room.

 

Are you ready to head over to the room that represents your social and public side? That would be the:

LIVING ROOM

DSCN2249.JPGThe intention here is to make this room a statement of “who you are” and “who you want the world to see.” For instance, this would be a great place to display your collections, books, art, and anything that is meaningful to your way of life. It’s important to make this room warm and welcoming, since it will be a place for others to gather in your home.

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Since the living room should represent not only who you are, but also the other occupants of the house, sometimes it can be tricky if you and your partner or roommate have different interests and personalities.

Mr. S and I had that issue. While our boys were young and simply being boys, I felt like I needed to make every room in our home soothing and calming, almost Zen-like in order to add more peaceful energy to our testosterone-infested nest. Little did I know, I created an environment that was more conducive to a quiet, meditative way of life which I needed, but the three males that lived with me were starting to shut down, become lethargic and non communicative. It was almost instinctual how Mr. S. picked up on the feeling. One Saturday morning as I was deliciously enjoying a restorative yoga class, Mr. S took the boys out for breakfast and then off to “find some cool thing to do that mom would never do” with them. Well, they found it. Two days later a Raymour and Flannigan truck pulled into our driveway, delivering the most vibrant, high energy-filled red sofas I’d ever seen. I was praying they were at the wrong address. This was years ago, but it was the beginning of my understanding of how effective and important living in a comfortable environment is to our health. And I bet you’re wondering how the story ends. Well, Mr. S and our boys have found their voices again, and I, though not totally in love with the red sofas, was able to create balance by adding some touches of calming Zen to the living room. It’s all about balance and compromise in Feng Shui and marriage.

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Are you ready to pop into your office?

HOME OFFICE

DSCN2273.JPGThis area of your home should be the place of power, because what happens in this room is directly related to your success. Make this room as important as your clients and projects are to you.

 

  • If possible, place your desk in the farthest corner from the entrance. It is best to sit in the “command” position so you can see the door, but not be directly in front of it.
  • It is best to have a solid wall rather than a window behind you. But if that’s not possible, use shades, plants or furniture to act as a buffer between you and the window.
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Our son’s study room

  • Try to have more space in front of your desk than behind it. The wall will support you, and the good ch’i has room and a clear path toward you and your business.
  • Choose your artwork and colors that go along with your business goals and aspirations. The art should be powerful and inspiring so that it creates a feeling of success for you.
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Our son really gets it.

  • Organization is critical in a home office. You want that powerful and productive energy to find you, right? So try to take care of your in-box, your to-do list, and your I hate to-do list and see if success and opportunities come your way. Do not let piles of paper accumulate on your desk, and don’t place that pile in the center of your desk. Have your in-box or to-do pile to the left or right.
  • Make sure you are comfortable sitting in your office chair. In Feng Shui, comfort is one of the major goals for which we strive. Does your chair make you feel powerful and stable, or does it cause you stress and pain affecting your work and peace of mind?

So my friends, did you ever have a teacher in school that just went on and on and on, even after the bell has rung? Well, you are so lucky you can close this tab when you’ve heard or read enough. I could talk for days about Feng Shui, but then you’d never come back. I’ll save some for another time. I hope this gives you some inspiration to look around your home to see if there are things you want to do to enhance your health, comfort, prosperity and happiness.

As always, if you have any questions, don’t hesitate to send me an email and I’ll get back to you promptly.


Until Next Time,

Be Well,

Suzy 😉

 

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